Coaching for Creative People

(such as: filmmakers, actors, artists, inventors, writers, designers, and composers.)

Executive coaching for creative types may seem odd. But if creative people are to prosper, they need to learn how to further their careers. That’s where executive coaching enters thestage.

Some artists fear that becoming financially successful will harm their art. But becoming affluent does not necessarily entail selling out. Peter Paul Rubens, for example, was a great artist, who knew how to impress with the rich and powerful. As a result, Rubens became very wealthy himself. Pablo Picasso managed to become a revolutionary force in the world of art, while becoming a multi-millionaire. With bit of little worldly wisdom, there’s no need to be a starving artist, writer, actor, composer, or inventor.

Nikola Tesla offers an interesting example of an extraordinarily creative inventor — indeed the greatest of the Twentieth Century — whose career could have profited from executive coaching. An executive coach would have helped prevent Tesla from being exploited by Edison, by finding the right patron. Instead Tesla was continually plagued by financial concerns.

Here, then, are some of the valuable skills that Dr. Mark Dillof canhelp you attain:

1. Attitude: Your relation to your particular profession is vitally important. Is it allabout money? Do you actually like the work you do, in all of its details? For example, if you are a musician, do you enjoy practicing and rehearsing? If not, don’t despair. It’s possible to learn to like it.

2. Self-knowledge: There’s a great deal to be said for knowing our strengths,weaknesses, and everything else about us. Then, you can develop the type of career ismost in accord with your strengths. For example, one of the greatest of magicians, Tony Slydini, knew that his strength lied in performing close-up, slight-of-handmiracles before small audiences. He could have performed large-scale illusions, butstuck to his strength and made a good living at it.

3. Interpersonal skills: Consider the example of an actor or musician. Unless you’realready famous, you need to get gigs. So you look for an agent. But here’s the catch: Atalent agency wont represent you unless you’re famous and even if they do, they wont devote much energy to getting you gigs. Consequently, you’ll have to get them yourself. That will mean making a lot of phone calls and doing a lot of networking to get work. There are many people with talent. Those who make it — in addition to working hard and being lucky — have developed strong interpersonal skills. Even if you are a shy person, such skills can be developed.

4. Business savvy: Learning the secrets of “rainmaking” are usually as key to success as are being good at what one does. Fortunately, it’s a good deal easier learning thesecrets of practice building than it is to know oneself.

5. Understanding of life: Ultimately, to be happy, you need to grasp the big picture.That’s where philosophy enters in. Amidst difficult times, you need to know that “This too shall pass.” Fail to grasp it and you will soon burn out. Grasp the big picture and you will smile like a Buddha, as you enjoy life’s rollercoaster ride. Dr. Mark Dillof has, for many years, been helping creative people become happy and successful.

The Next Step???

P.S. No matter what part of the globe you inhabit — from New York City (NYC) to Los Angeles CA, from London to Tokyo, from Boston MA to Chicago IL, from Brooklyn to Queens, from Binghamton to Ithaca, from Scranton PA to Syracuse NY, from Vestal to Endicott, from White Plains to Westchester, from Rochester to Buffalo, from Nassau to Suffolk, from Louisville KY to Cincinnati OH, from Indianapolis IN to Hartford CT, from Hollywood CA to Miami Beach FL, from Minneapolis MN to Madison WI, from Portland OR to Washington DC, from Seattle WA to the Bronx NY, from Toronto to Vancouver BC Canada, from Albany to Manhattan, from Hempstead to New Rochelle — distance is no barrier to an illuminating session of executive coaching, career counseling or life coaching!

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